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Must Try Bangkok Street Foods on Khao San Road

 
 

Khao San Road is a tourist destination itself - an entirely different world from the more expensive Bangkok city centre. Depending on which side you enter Khao San Road, you might be greeted by the usual fast food establishments such as KFC, Subway, Burger King, and McDonald’s. No matter how homesick you are, do not give in to 'safe' burgers and fries! You are in Bangkok, so why not live on the local delicacies? You couldn't find better street food anywhere else.

Here are some of the tasty treats you should not miss when you visit Khao San Road.

1. Noodles. Whether it be stir-fried or with soup, you must try the slurp-worthy noodles of Bangkok. Many backpackers practialy live on cheap pad thai, which is sold on almost every cooking cart along the street. There is a large flat pan in the middle of the caddy and your meal will be cooked right in front of you. Choose from chicken, shrimp, or plain vegetables. A pad thai dish will cost you around 50baht or less. If you are not too hungry, share with a friend because the serving is quite big. These noodles will be cooked in under five minutes, but you might have to wait in line. Feel free to add condiments like chili powder to your liking, then find a spot on the curb or just eat standing up.

2. Fruits. Khao San Road has some of the cheapest tropical fruits, and they're sold by carting vendors and pop-up stalls. I recommend the fresh coconuts.  A smaller one will cost your around 10baht, and a larger variant is around 15 to 20 baht.  The vendor will just chop the top part of the coconut and hand you a straw so you can sip the wholesome goodness. Stalls that offer fruit shakes also pop up on Khao San in the afternoon.

3. Barbecues. If you see smoke, follow it. There’s surely a vendor offering barbecued meats hot off the grill. Choose from the usual pork, fish, or chicken if you are not feeling too adventurous. If you are feeling brave, there are more exotic choices such as duck heads, chicken or pork innards and intestines, or insects. Are you a vegetarian? Don’t worry, there’s grilled corn on the cob.

4. Creepy Crawlers. Finally, for the truly adventurous (or truly drunk), there are fried insects and the bugs. To prep your palate, start off with bamboo worms  or silk larvae, then move on to ant queens, crickets, weevils, and grasshoppers. To see how brave you really are, try a fried scorpion on a stick - probably the most intimidating looking of all the creepy crawlers on the menu. It's easy to spot vendors selling fried bugs because tourists surround them. Some vendors also go around bars selling scorpions from a handcarried container. These bugs are deep fried and salted. They are nutritious, quite cheap, and go really well with beer.

noodles - khao san street food bangkok

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Before You Eat Asian Street Food:


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barbecue - khao san street food bangkok

insects - khao san street food bangkok

fruits - khao san street food bangkok

UPDATE: Here's a video of Khao San road's pad thai lady creating her masterpiece. Yummy!

EXTRA: The Bangkok street food scene isn't limited to Khao San. In fact, you might find more authentic dishes and get the chance to eat with locals in the Pratunam market area, near Baiyoke tower. Some of the streets turn into open-air street food areas when the sun goes down. Watch the video below:

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